Why wouldn't our coach be comfortable teaching us how to flick?

Discussion in 'Fencing Discussion' started by Christian Edwards, Oct 7, 2018.

  1. Christian Edwards

    Christian Edwards Rookie

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    Even though most of us have been fencing for a while, my fencing coach still isn't comfortable teaching us how to flick. What would be a good reason for him not to?
     
  2. Purple Fencer

    Purple Fencer Podium

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    Maybe he doesn’t know how or feels it’s too low of a percentage shot after the timing change in 2005.
     
  3. jkormann

    jkormann Podium

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    You don't way which weapon: Epee or Foil.
    As PF said, he may not feel like he can teach it effectively, or he feels you may not have all the tools to learn it. There's a lot that goes into a flick (distance, timing), not just the blade technique. Miss one of those and you risk a) missing; b) landing and possibly injuring your opponent with the blade flat.
     
  4. AllezCat

    AllezCat DE Bracket

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    My guess: he thinks that fundamental technique, distance, and timing are more important than trick shots.

    Reading your other thread, if you're still calling your epee a "sword", you're not ready to flick. :)
     
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  5. InFerrumVeritas

    InFerrumVeritas DE Bracket

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    What weapon and how long is "a while"?
     
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  6. Privateer

    Privateer Podium

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    it's a low percentage hit and if you do it wrong you just hurt people
     
  7. dcchew

    dcchew Podium

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    The same goes for toe touches in epee. If it's right, it's a thing of beauty. If it's done wrong, you can hurt somebody.

    Many years ago, a beginner tried a toe touch on me. He used his epee like a hammer and slammed it into my big toe. I had a black and blue sore toe for a couple of weeks.
     
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  8. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

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    "That wouldn't have happened if you had parried." - Ralph Faulkner ;)
     
  9. jdude97

    jdude97 Podium

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    I didn't officially learn how to flick (well at least) until my 10th year fencing epee. Granted in the 2 years since then I've used it to propel me well up the rankings. The flick is just one part of what's changed in my game, but it has been very valuable (much more so as a preparation than a final hit). So this is to say that it's never too late to learn the flick but also don't fret if you haven't learned it yet. And when in doubt, as might as well be the motto of FdN, Ask your coach!
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2018
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  10. Privateer

    Privateer Podium

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    yeah, i feel like landing 1 is all it takes in a bout. cuz then they have to worry about it.
     
  11. Zebra

    Zebra Podium

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    Plus you feel great if that threat happens to actually land.
     
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  12. jdude97

    jdude97 Podium

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    If you do it right, it's hard to tell what is a flick and what is a deep attack until it's too late. So you flick over and over and then all of a sudden, wham! one of those flicks turns into a fleche to the upper arm.
     
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  13. Privateer

    Privateer Podium

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    I was fencing a vet-B in a final last season, he scored a couple quick touches, and seemingly thought he was going to roll me. Then I scored a parry-riposte flick to the hip. And suddenly his entire tactic changed and he kept his distance and had to work much harder.

    i still lost, but he definitely protected his flank more and didn't dive in.
     
  14. jjefferies

    jjefferies Podium

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    Like I haven't hurt you enough? Now I should start practicing my toe touch?
     
  15. dcchew

    dcchew Podium

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    If you try a touch toe on me, am I required to help you up afterwards? :)
     
  16. jjefferies

    jjefferies Podium

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    Oh, most definitely. And no smirking either!
     
  17. dcchew

    dcchew Podium

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    Definitely no smirking. However, a well timed knee to the side of the head might be in order. Just another bout between fellow old geezer friends. :)
     
  18. SevenDad

    SevenDad DE Bracket

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    A few years ago, another parent was recounting to me how his kid and her friends were trying to get their coach, Buckie Leach, to teach them to flick but he was resisting as well.

    Most of those kids have gone on to become top foilists and Buckie splits his time between being the ND foil coach and coaching the women's national team...so, I say listen to your coach.
     
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  19. jjefferies

    jjefferies Podium

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    As has been pointed out flicking is generally a low probability of success tactic. And hence a coach might feel time would better be spent on fundamentals of timing and distance. That said I do remember watching Eric Hansen (epee) fencing a fellow who would charge in at him. Eric backed up and flicked to the top of the charger's head.(again in epee). Apparently the guy didn't get the message the first time perhaps thinking it was just luck on a low probability touch and tried it at least once more so Eric could demonstrate it wasn't luck. Think Eric may have been #1 in Div 1 at the time or at least top 10. Personally I've been trying various flicks (epee) and am finding the timing of foot work and blade work difficult but intriguing. Perhaps the OP should watch and try on their own.
     
  20. jkormann

    jkormann Podium

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    One of the coaches I know flicks to the pinkie-nail or palm. "Frustrating" isn't the f-word I use when he does that to me.
     

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