Which Grip is Best?

Discussion in 'Armory - Q&A' started by FortyTwoBlades, May 29, 2004.

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Which Grip Do You Prefer?

  1. French

    98 vote(s)
    20.6%
  2. Belgian

    56 vote(s)
    11.8%
  3. German

    38 vote(s)
    8.0%
  4. Visconti

    164 vote(s)
    34.5%
  5. Schermasport

    7 vote(s)
    1.5%
  6. Spanish

    4 vote(s)
    0.8%
  7. Rambeau

    2 vote(s)
    0.4%
  8. Russian

    21 vote(s)
    4.4%
  9. I fence sabre, stupid!

    45 vote(s)
    9.5%
  10. Other

    40 vote(s)
    8.4%
  1. El Chucko

    El Chucko Rookie

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    As long as we're talking about grips...

    At Pomme de Terre, I saw more than one epeeist with a synthetic French grip that was rather wide and fat, and the color of it was almost "flesh-colored." As I recall, it appeared very flexible, as at least one fencer has his bent significantly downward. (Kind of like a small banana.)

    Contestants: Name That Grip! :D
     
  2. Frank Pratt

    Frank Pratt DE Bracket

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    Sad, but true. You can get just about any of the grips listed in the poll from most of the vendors out there, but your grips are truly unique!
     
  3. Zilverzmurfen

    Zilverzmurfen Rookie

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    The best grip is of course the one that fits your hand and feels the most comfortable for you to fence with.
     
  4. Kettu

    Kettu Rookie

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    I own two Belgian grips, and am satisfied with their performance, but I can't help but lust after those Schermasport grips with the gripping for the thumb.
     
  5. mrbiggs

    mrbiggs Podium

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    If anyone cares, I now switch between Belgian and Visconti. Each takes a couple days of getting used to every time I switch. I prefer Visconti, as Belgians give me blisters and don't fit my hand as well, but I'm one of a very few in my club. So when my weapons break, it's back to Belgians.

    I really don't like Russian grips.
     
  6. Bored Fencer

    Bored Fencer Rookie

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    Golubitsky-Pro Ultra Grip

    I mightn't know much about fencing (only a year and a half mark at it) but I know what I like :p I spent the first year using a french grip but then got a bit lazy and moved onto a visconti grip. I felt it gave me increased power but my point control suffered quite a bit. Then I bought a new foil from Leon Paul and decided to get a Golubitsky-Pro Ultra Grip ( you've got to love the ''ultra bit'' ;) ). It's essentially a belgian grip but with some slight modifications. My point control seems a lot tighter with it and I find it very comfortable too so I think I'll be sticking with it for a while.
     
  7. Smyles

    Smyles Rookie

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    Had you tried a regular belgian grip before using the new one? Is it anything a bit of tape couldn't replicate??
     
  8. Mizore

    Mizore Rookie

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    Belgian

    I am just starting out but bought my first epee recently. The armorer at a tiny and very old shop in Kichijoji Tokyo spent a lot of time helping me select a grip. I liked the overall feeling of the German the most. But I didn't like the long extension that felt it would hinder the wrist. In the end I bought a Belgian with a couple small modifications including shortening the front to allow my hand to be a bit closer to the bell. It fits my hand perfectly and, I hope will prove to have been a good choice.
     
  9. DHCJr

    DHCJr Armorer

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    As the Belgium was modified, so could the German. One common modification to many pistol grips is the shortening of the back extension.
     
  10. Bored Fencer

    Bored Fencer Rookie

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    I'd only used a belgian a couple of times just to see what they were like. Borrowing them at competitions and the like. I'd say tape would do the trick. If you go to http://www.leonpaul.com/acatalog/Foil_Handles.html. It has a good picture of the grip and a right up too in which they say the Golubitsky used tape but they replaced it with rubber tubing. I notice as well the top notch (horn?) is slightly bigger then regular Belgians.
     
  11. SäbelFechter

    SäbelFechter Rookie

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    I've had the opposite result. I've been using french grips since I started doing epee and decided to give pistol grip a try since I've heard that it's the way to go if you like taking your opponent's blade with parries, beats, etc. Anyway, I picked up a new epee with a Visconti grip on Monday from the local dealer and have used it the past two evenings at practise (having never used one before) and my point control seems to have improved as I'm getting wrist hits much more easily now than I did with the french grip.
     
  12. Red Devil

    Red Devil Rookie

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    Belgian, ROCK ON!..

    Ya
     
  13. migopod

    migopod Podium

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    I've been mostly using the two legal spanish grips (cetrulos and offsets). The cetrulo is very comfortable but blows for angulation. I find the offset is nicer for angulation, but still tends to get caught on the wrist. I've also played with belgians but found them a bit too cramped.

    I 100% agree with the previous post about the importance of a good glove. I fenced an evening with a synthetic glove recently (misplaced my good leather glove while moving), and my hand was very sore after about an hour.

    I also just ordered a Zivkovic BII for experimentation purposes...

    One thing that i have been wondering after perusing a long-dead thread about
    legal grips is: How is it that the Italian is legal and the spanish modern is
    not? There are multiple accepted hand positions for the Italian AND it can be
    pommel gripped. Does it not qualify as an orthapedic grip, or is there some
    exception that allows it because it's super-traditional?
     
  14. houdini1982

    houdini1982 Rookie

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    I have recently ordered a Spanish Offset from Triplette. They do seel it, but it is technically (sp.) illegal in competition. In the Rule book item M.4 it says the grip must fix the hand in one posisition with the thumb no more than 2cm from the guard. So.... you can have one, but you might get called out on it. :)
     
    Redblade likes this.
  15. DHCJr

    DHCJr Armorer

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    What Triplette sells is NOT a Dos Santos, which is illegal. What a Dos Santos looks like is first it has a French Pommel and it has what looks like a SST airplane looking tail fin at the back pointing down.

    The handle that Triplette sells is a Spanish Offset which has never been banned at a competition, at least not by anyone who would know. The only types that have been mentioned as illegal have been those with External pommels and Spanish Offset has an Internal pommel.
     
  16. fatfencer

    fatfencer Podium

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    I'm sure part of it lies with the fact that it is, as you say, a super-traditional grip like the French grip.

    However, no one who uses that grip consistently would ever use it without the wrist strap which prevents pommeling/ extreme position changes. Moreover there is only one correct accepted hand position to hold the Italian 2 prong.

    Fatfencer

    PS: If they went to stiffer blades, prevented oblique mounting and over customization of grips, and just mandated the Italian/French be the only 2 grips we wouldn't need the timing changes. I personally love the italian grip.
     
  17. fatfencer

    fatfencer Podium

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    I find my circle 6 practically inviolable with it. It also makes for great ripostes along the blade. I like croise with it too.

    Its really fun to do a beat straight and knock their visconti or their french out of their hands.

    Although I really agree with Nadi's centralized guard theory, my coach is French schooled which actually makes sense because of the wide angulations and flicking attacks of today. Better to protect one side or another.

    Fatfencer
     
  18. twisterfencing

    twisterfencing Podium

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    Enough said. Totally agree with you Artisan.
     
  19. ^|EDGE|^

    ^|EDGE|^ Rookie

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    Russian grips look and feel really chunky. You have to file down the sharp edges before they are any good.
     
  20. needle

    needle Podium

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    Russian grips are blanks to be adjusted to your hand, not "ready for use out-of-box", it's pretty funny to see them treated otherwise
     

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