TSA Scam

Discussion in 'Water Cooler' started by jjefferies, Dec 6, 2017.

  1. jjefferies

    jjefferies Podium

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    Messages:
    3,707
    Likes Received:
    160
    I've long thought the whole TSA checkin was as stupid as the govt could get. Then they started giving out the "TSA PRE" qualification on certain airline tickets which allow you to speed through the entire screening process. Now that they've shown how much faster you could get through the maze they've created, they're willing to sell you the right to bypass much of the screening process.
    "With a 5 year, $85 membership, you can speed through security and don’t need to remove your:
    shoes, laptops, liquids, belts and light jackets."

    https://www.tsa.gov/precheck?EMD=&R...fe0c06990e6ed61d6cbec66dc2d6cd68eac01b6f9a4c4

    This is so irritating only a business person could appreciate creating an artificial barrier and then selling a way around the barrier. Someone like that Yella-haired Satan. But surely he's not smart enough to do it. It has to be one of his apprentices.
     
  2. mfp

    mfp Podium

    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Messages:
    1,991
    Likes Received:
    310
    You're blaming a 4 year old program on the current administration?

    $85 TSA Pre applications were first offered in 2013.
     
    cathy a former fencer likes this.
  3. SlamJammington

    SlamJammington Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2017
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    85 bucks for 5 years?
    So 17 bucks a year.
    That's not a lot. If you can afford to travel enough to want pre-check, then you can probably spare less than 20 bucks a year.

    Besides, paying for better treatment has been part of our culture for a very long time. From tips to car washes, you always pay more for better treatment. You're not being forced to pay, and the standard process hasn't been slowed down

    It's not like the TSA was employed just so that this could be implemented. The TSA exists as security theater. Most of our counter-terrorist security is dealt with way before you even enter the airport, with background checks and investigations into possible terrorists. The TSA just exists so that you think you're safe, and maybe make you a little bit safer. The TSA know how slow and annoying they are, so they began offering the pre-check so that people who are trustworthy can get through faster. But, this is extra work on their part, so of course they're gonna be payed more.
     
  4. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    36,626
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    Another instance of favoritism toward the rich! Injustice! Inequality! What about the 99%?!

    Help! Help! I'm being repressed! :D
     
  5. Black Widow

    Black Widow Made the Cut

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2017
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    35
    The airline I use for the mileage program automatically started giving me TSA precheck. I didn't pay anything extra.:cool:
     
    cathy a former fencer likes this.
  6. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    36,626
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    Every time you fly?

    I get my boarding pass marked with TSA pre-check every once in a while, for reasons known only to the airline. Not consistently, though.
     
  7. mfp

    mfp Podium

    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Messages:
    1,991
    Likes Received:
    310
    The airline doesn't know the reasons. Neither TSA Pre-check nor SSSS passenger status on a boarding pass is determined by the airline.
     
  8. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    36,626
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    By whom is it determined, then? Surely the TSA is not in control of airline boarding pass printing?
     
  9. mfp

    mfp Podium

    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Messages:
    1,991
    Likes Received:
    310
    Airlines send passenger ticket info to the TSA. The TSA is in charge of determing if a passenger gets designated as a "selectee" (SSSS) or elligible for Pre-check for that flight. The airline prints the appropriate designation on the boarding pass and encodes it in the bar code.

    "Additionally, using its Secure Flight system, the TSA will also proactively prescreen Passengers who are traveling, with the goal of possibly pre-clearing more Passengers to use TSA PreCheck lanes. These passengers will not be required to submit any additional information, submit an application, or pay a fee. However, TSA will be able to provide some of these Passengers with the opportunity for expedited screening on a flight-by-flight basis by analyzing information already provided by Passengers through existing Secure Flight program requirements such as name, date of birth, and gender."​
     
  10. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    36,626
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    That's some weird stuff, considering that one's name, date of birth and gender seldom change from one flight to another.
     
  11. jeff

    jeff Podium

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2002
    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    346
    TSA Pre is well worth it, as is Global Entry if you travel internationally. The cost is negligible, and if you're time is worth more than the small amount of money it's a no brainer. The various programs are confusing but there's a chart that helps explain the difference: https://www.dhs.gov/trusted-traveler-comparison-chart

    When you apply you go in person to an enrollment site and show ID and get fingerprinted. For Global Entry they ask you questions, none of which involve the air speed of a sparrow.

    Sometimes non-TSA Pre people are given TSA status for a flight. Sometimes TSA Pre people are pulled for screening. It's done on a random basis, which is sensible.
     
  12. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    36,626
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    And no one bats an eye at the fact that the government taxes us in order to pay, supposedly, for all of the services it provides---and then also charges fees for those services.
     
  13. SlamJammington

    SlamJammington Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2017
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Any examples of this? I'm not old enough to pay taxes yet, so I'm not quite sure what you're referencing
     
  14. jeff

    jeff Podium

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2002
    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    346
    Not old enough to pay taxes? Oh lord! :)

    Some (never "all") government programs and services are paid from tax revenue, others via fees (tolls are an example), fines, etc. There is sometimes argument over whether a particular item should be paid from one or the other.
     
  15. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    36,626
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    Sorry, then your parents pay taxes to the government so that the latter can provide various services.

    Just looking at the TSA. It does a lot of things which can be described as services. It pays the costs of most of them from its budget, which comes from taxes. For instance, take the security screening process at airports. The salaries and benefits of all of those TSA agents, the bag X-ray machines and body scanners and the explosives sniffers and all the rest, come out of funds obtained via taxation. You do not pay a fee every time you go through a checkpoint, even if you have Pre-Check or Global Entry.

    Pre-Check and Global Entry are fee-for-service, though. You pay a certain set amount for the checking and certification process.

    Frankly I can't see why it's done this way, unless it's meant to deter people from using that particular service. There's no substantive economic difference between Service A, the security screening process, and Service B, the background checking process.

    In fact, by paying a fee for Pre-Check you are actually reducing the costs of providing Service A to you---not by a lot, but by some amount. You save TSA money, even as you save yourself time and inconvenience.

    So you ( or your parents ) are paying taxes to pay for TSA's services, and then paying again in order to---get less of TSA's services?
     
  16. downunder

    downunder is a Verified Fencing Expertdownunder Podium

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2003
    Messages:
    3,862
    Likes Received:
    473
    Actually you do, you just don't see it directly as it's included in the ticket price.

    https://www.tsa.gov/for-industry/security-fees

    It's quite logical to offer enhanced services for enhanced fees.
     
  17. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    36,626
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    You find that you go through only one security checkpoint when you fly? Buy a lot of one-way tickets and never make international connections? Then perhaps you can manage to pay a fee per check. Most of us do not.
     
  18. jeff

    jeff Podium

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2002
    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    346
    The details are very clear. The TSA fee is described in the link downunder provided says: "The Passenger Fee, also known as the September 11 Security Fee, is collected by air carriers from passengers at the time air transportation is purchased. Air carriers then remit the fees to TSA. The fee is currently $5.60 per one-way trip in air transportation that originates at an airport in the U.S., except that the fee imposed per round trip shall not exceed $11.20." There is a fee you pay per checkpoint - you pay it in advance when you book the flight, not when you go through security.. I haven't looked at multi-leg flights but it's correct for domestic round trip.

    EDIT: with TSA Pre or Global Entry, you also pay a fee up front, for an improved experience. Places that have toll roads collect them both at the point of use (toll bodth) or by a pre-paid system with a transponder (EZ-PASS, FASTCHECK (spelling?)) The road is partially paid for by taxes, partially paid for by such fees. One can debate the right amounts and who should pay it, but the practice of funding things by a combination of both is not odd.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2017
  19. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    36,626
    Likes Received:
    1,300
    I stand corrected. Didn't read far enough down.
     

Share This Page