Safest way to bend an epee while rewiring?

Discussion in 'Armory - Q&A' started by Ronan Rgvd, Jun 20, 2017.

  1. Ronan Rgvd

    Ronan Rgvd Made the Cut

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    Is there any risk when bending the epee blade while rewiring; for example the blade springing out and possibly lashing out in a way that could cause injury?
     
  2. K O'N

    K O'N Podium

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    Yes. Be careful.
     
  3. dcchew

    dcchew Podium

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  4. Purple Fencer

    Purple Fencer Podium

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    20:22 time mark for a bending chain in use.
     
  5. Ronan Rgvd

    Ronan Rgvd Made the Cut

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    Ok thx for the tips
     
  6. jkormann

    jkormann Podium

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    Bending chains are simple:
    2 copper end-caps
    3 S-hooks
    1 3-ft chain

    Punch a hole into a copper end-cap and using an S-Hook, affix it to one end of the chain. Repeat for the other end.
    Take the remaining S-hook, put it approx 1/2 way down the chain. Leave the S-hook end not in the chain slightly open so you can hook into the links where you want.

    Follow Purp's video.
     
  7. Fairfield_Fencing_Armory

    Fairfield_Fencing_Armory Made the Cut

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    I made the mistake of using plastic cups on my first chain and the tension broke them. Luckily it didn't cause any injuries.
    I then used 1/2" copper endcaps and drilled a small hole for the chain. If I do it again, I will use larger cups to accomodate the butt end of a french grip pommel. Then, I put my third S-hook near the cup on one end so I can find it and clip it whever i want, depending on if I'm working with a short tang or a weapon with the grip already on it (like when I glue down a popped wire).
    I'm careful not to bend the weapon so far that the tip slides out of the cup!
    Then, I put the glue on, starting from the barrel end and watch it run down the groove. When it is 99% there, I turn the blade horizontal and hang it over the back of my toolbox lid so That the tip and tang are level. That way, the tip and the tang are a bit higher than the middle and the extra glue won't flow into the barrel or into the spaghetti.
     
  8. Mergs

    Mergs Podium

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    You can get one here, too. And how to use it here. Go to the 9:45 point.

    As for jkormann's instructions, you really don't need the s-hooks. Just use a link of the chain. I use #14 or #16 jack chain. I also have a chain with both a 1/2" and 1" dia copper cap on one end so I can use it on a French grip to glue a popped wire.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2017
  9. jkormann

    jkormann Podium

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    The chain I bought had welded links, otherwise yeah. I found the s-hook with an open end useful to hold the chain while bending the blade.
    Different sized caps is a good idea for the reason you and Fairfield pointed out.
     
  10. dcchew

    dcchew Podium

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    On my personal rewiring rigs, the overall chain length is just enough to bend a full length blade to a good curvature.

    I place the S-hook at a location on the chain where a fully assembled epee would bend properly if I clip the S-hook on the lip if the guard. Perhaps a bit dangerous, but convenient.
     
  11. brtech

    brtech Podium

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    I have a chain like the ones described and I use it whenever I have my full kit available. I also have a more portable variety Ted Li made. It uses the same copper end caps, but it has a length of thin nylon cord instead of a metal chain. One end of the cord is tied to one end cap. The cord then goes through a small rectangular piece of plastic with two holes a bit bigger than the cord diameter, through the S hook on the other cap, and then is tied to the other hole in the plastic. In use, you slide the plastic bit to put tension on the blade. It stays where you put it because the tension holds the "loose" part of the cord going through one hole against the edge of the plastic. It's very effective and quite small. It fits in a pocket of my "go bag" that I carry whenever I'm in the venue with a team.

    As far as glueing technique goes, every armorer is different. I do drop at a time with the blade pointed down, starting just below the barrel and watching it move down the blade until it's just over half way. Then I reverse the blade and start at the tang, repeating drop at a time until it meets the point in the middle where I stopped before. That lets you control the glue at the tang better. Then hang the blade by the chain so the middle of the blade is the lowest point.
     
  12. Fairfield_Fencing_Armory

    Fairfield_Fencing_Armory Made the Cut

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    What a great idea: a portable, lightweight blade-bending chain!
    I'm going to try to make one out of tent cord (because it comes with a plastic tensioning slide and I have lots) and pvc caps if they're lighter. Maybe it will be lighter for my travel kit which is becoming really heavy. I'll post the results if this thread is still active (or if it fails and is dangerous).
     
  13. dcchew

    dcchew Podium

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    Brian, you need to bring your gizmo with you to Salt Lake City! I'm in never ending struggle to lighten my tool case. Every ounce counts to getting my case under 50 lbs.
     
  14. ShortFoot

    ShortFoot DE Bracket

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    I have one with PVC caps and it hasn't failed so far, but I do wonder about breakage or slippage and have thought about going with a rigid board or batten instead, with holes bored at a slant to hold the ends in place. Is that something people do? Maybe not ideal for portability, but for at-home/at-armory work?
     
  15. DangerMouse

    DangerMouse Podium

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    I made 6 chains with PVC caps and they've lasted for more than a decade without a single one breaking.
     
  16. jkormann

    jkormann Podium

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    In a pinch I used plastic film canisters. They held for about 3 years of occasional use.
     
  17. DangerMouse

    DangerMouse Podium

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    I had made one that way back in college. It lasted for about 3 months of regular use before breaking.
     
  18. brtech

    brtech Podium

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    Ask Ted to give you one :)
     
  19. SJCFU#2

    SJCFU#2 Podium

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    You can drill holes into a board if you want, or attach blocks to a board to from "stops" which the blade can press up against - I've seen both used. Not particularly portable however that's not so much of an issue for a club or home armory and being rather large, it is also less likely to grow legs and wander off (like a chain can).

    I've heard of people using window and door frames and even ladders - it all depends on what you have available (first time I heard of someone using plastic film canisters was from a professional photographer back in the days before digital cameras).
     
  20. sdubinsky

    sdubinsky DE Bracket

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    I used to stick mine in a drawer, close the drawer, and hang something off the end of the blade.
     

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