Rotary Dremel Wheels for Armoring

Discussion in 'Armory - Q&A' started by Philix, Apr 30, 2019.

  1. Philix

    Philix Rookie

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    Hi everyone! I was just wondering what wheels I should use for armoring, for things such as cutting the tang, cleaning the blades' wire groove and also taking off rust and etc. Thanks!
     
  2. posineg

    posineg DE Bracket

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    I know this might be a taboo but I personally feel that a "cutting wheel" in the wrong hands will hurt a blade more than helping. I can understand using a cutting wheel to cut the tang but to clean a wire groove is just taking away metal and lessening the life of a blade with an already short life.

    Some wet/dry metal sandpaper does just as good of a job and is easier to control.
     
  3. K O'N

    K O'N Podium

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    I use a cutting wheel in a fast pass to clean out the groove, but you can't sit still or overdo it. If you keep it moving you can prep a blade very fast, but if you go too slow or hit one spot too hard you can damage the blade. If you're worried about it use a hand scraper, a small sharpened screwdriver or something.

    If you do use a cutting wheel, everyone in the room should be wearing eye protection. Those things can fly apart with no warning.
     
  4. sdubinsky

    sdubinsky DE Bracket

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    Is the cutting wheel/screwdriver instead of an acetone bath, or in addition to?
     
  5. jkormann

    jkormann Podium

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  6. Purple Fencer

    Purple Fencer Podium

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    Reinforced fiberglass for cutting the tang. Diamond wheel for cleaning the groove.

    Diamond wheel around 1:30 here:



    Fibreglass wheel at 3:30 here:



    For rust, I use the deburring wheel on my bench grinder.

    All of my armory vids at http://www.homfencing.com/armory-videos.html
     
  7. Purple Fencer

    Purple Fencer Podium

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    In addition to. Acetone WILL leave a residue you need to get out.
     
  8. neevel

    neevel Armorer

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    The jack-of-all-trades is the standard Dremel cut-off wheel (which is a consumable, they come in packs of 20). Like Sam, I use diamond wheels for cleaning grooves and fiber wheels for when I need to cut tangs with a Dremel. I've taken to using the #530 stainless wire wheel for cleaning epees (after removing the wire with either a heat gun or acetone) because it gets at more of the wider groove in a pass than a disc.
     
  9. Purple Fencer

    Purple Fencer Podium

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    How durable are those wire wheels? Every time I've used one for an epee, they never last. I might've been using the wrong model, tho.
     
  10. dcchew

    dcchew Podium

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    I use a bolt cutter to cut blade tangs. It's quick and you don't have to any electrical outlets. I've had my bolt cutter for 40 years now. It still works like a charm.

    A tip! I clip one end of a mask cord to the blade and the other end to the portion of the tang that will be cut off. Once you cut the tang, there's stored energy in the cut off tang. It will go flying in any direction.
     
  11. Purple Fencer

    Purple Fencer Podium

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    Ahh...the "nail clippers." I used them when I first started out...but I'm not a big guy and it was always a little difficult to get the process started. Dremel's a lot easier....plus I don;t habve to worry aboputy chasing the theads at the top.

    And the shorter the piece coming off, the farther it's gonna fly if it ISN'T secured!
     
  12. neevel

    neevel Armorer

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    The #530 Stainless Steel- I've always gotten a few months use from one at a minimum.
     
  13. Mergs

    Mergs Podium

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    To answer the OPs original question - #420 Dremel cutoff wheels for epee; #409 Dremel cutoff wheels for foil; Dremel EZ lock metal cutoff wheels for tangs and #000 Dremel cutoff wheels for Sabers.
     
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  14. neevel

    neevel Armorer

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    Note that the #000 cutoff wheels require you to verbalize your own "wheeeeee-grrauwwer" sounds in order to make them function properly.
     
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  15. dcchew

    dcchew Podium

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    Sam, you need to hit the gym more often to build up your biceps. Of course, it helps to have the right tool to do the job.

    I use an old Stanley bolt cutter which unfortunately, is not longer sold. I bought mine back in the 70s when 12-24 threads was the thread size for tangs in the USA.. What made this particular bolt cutter so easy to use was that one of the tapped hole size was 12-24. You could shear the tang to correct length and a couple of strokes of a flat file to clean up the end thread profile. It was quick to cut a blade tang to size.

    Unfortunately, I can't redrill and tap one of the holes for a M6 thread. The jaws are hardened steel. I just use the nearest through hole size in the jaws and go to work. I can nibble off 1/8" lengths of the tang using this bolt cutter.

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/VINTAGE-ST...4&hash=item23bb8d6f35:g:vWcAAOSwZo1cyJSU#rwid
     
  16. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

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    Bah, you ALL seem to need mechanical augmentation of some sort. Me, I just bite the ends off of my sabre blades. ;)

    ( Actually I use a hacksaw. Still no leveraging force by mechanical means though. :p )
     
  17. posineg

    posineg DE Bracket

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    I have found that with bolt cutters you can place the lower limb on the ground and just push down on the top limb. No squeezing, just use the weight.
     
  18. neevel

    neevel Armorer

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    I generally just use a hacksaw with a high-speed steel blade to cut tangs unless I'm traveling somewhere where carrying a hacksaw along is inconvenient. The key is the high-speed steel blade; ordinary carbon steel blades will cut very slowly, especially on maraging blades.
     
  19. monitorlizerd

    monitorlizerd DE Bracket

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  20. Pezza

    Pezza Rookie

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    Sorry but I can't believe that anyone would use bolt cutters to cut off a Tang. it's like using a sledgehammer to Hammer in a nail. I use a junior hacksaw very fine blade takes 30 seconds. Pezza
     

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