How to pronounce the parry positions?

Discussion in 'Fencing Discussion' started by Dazed and Confused, Feb 2, 2008.

  1. Dazed and Confused

    Dazed and Confused Rookie

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    Below are the pronunciations that I've always heard, but are these standard? Also, what language are these terms in?

    Prime - preem

    Seconde - sekohnd

    Tierce - teerseh

    Carte - kart

    Quinte - keent

    Sixte - sixt

    Septime - septeem

    Octave - oktahv
     
  2. Neinteen

    Neinteen Rookie

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    french right? I use the super American pronunciation...

    Like Quinte as Kwint.
     
  3. veeco

    veeco Podium

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    Almost all of them are correct, except for quinte. It's not a long 'e', more like a nasal sound. There isn't any equivalent sound in English that I know of, so it's hard to describe using just text.

    French, what else were you expecting? :)
     
  4. commiemermaid

    commiemermaid Rookie

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    One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight.
     
  5. Dazed and Confused

    Dazed and Confused Rookie

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    LOL...but who says one for prime?
     
  6. commiemermaid

    commiemermaid Rookie

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    I've never done that parry with my coach, but kids on my team definitely say "one".
     
  7. MUHSfencing

    MUHSfencing Rookie

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    or: prima, secunda, terza, quarta, quinta, sexta, septima

    5th seems to be by far the strangest one, as it can be in any one of a number of places depending on who you ask...
     
  8. Dazed and Confused

    Dazed and Confused Rookie

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    Yeah, 5 is strange. I've seen it used for a head parry (sabre), four with the hand turned over (foil and epee), and another name for 7 (some German books). 7 is pretty weird too though since it can refer to 7 or high-7, which don't seem to be related at all.

    On a random note, it seems like carte can also be spelled quarte. Hmmm...maybe we should just use numbers.
     
  9. Neinteen

    Neinteen Rookie

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    are the parries for sabre and foil and epee differently numbered? I was arguing with a sabre about a parry 2 and was just wondering..... ...
     
  10. Dazed and Confused

    Dazed and Confused Rookie

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    Just 5, the others are the same, I think
     
  11. HDG

    HDG Podium

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    Did the sabre argue back?
    What was the glove's opinion?
     
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  12. p1nkp4nther

    p1nkp4nther Rookie

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    I have a lingual question. I can't speak French, so excuse my ignorance. I think one count from 1 to 10 in French like this:
    # Un (uh) 1
    # Deux (duh) 2
    # Trois (twa) 3
    # Quatre (cat) 4
    # Cinq (sank) 5
    # Six (seis) 6
    # Sept (set) 7
    # Huit (wheat) 8
    # Neuf (noof) 9
    # Dix (dease) 10

    I am guessing that the parries are position or rank names instead of numbers? For example: seventh = Septime while seven = Sept and second = Seconde while two = Deux?
     
  13. rudd

    rudd Podium

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    My understating is that they are the ordinal number from Old French.
     
  14. Go? Fencing?

    Go? Fencing? Rookie

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    Not in modern French, where you have seventh = septième and second = deuxième, for example. Prime, Seconde, etc. are French, but not modern French.
     
  15. Pescados666

    Pescados666 Rookie

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    And how do you pronounce neuvieme?
     
  16. Zilverzmurfen

    Zilverzmurfen Rookie

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    Nuh-vee-emm.

    Sort of. It's difficult to explain the "eu" sound as you don't really have it in english.
     
  17. Spratico

    Spratico Rookie

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    In the words of Aldo Nadi...(if it works)... "no one cares if you call your counter of quarte 'Mae West.' " He was referring to remises and redoublements.
     
  18. rdg

    rdg DE Bracket

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    The correct pronouciations are

    First,
    Second,
    Third, etc.,

    nuef said. eh?

    Sam
     
  19. The Chaotic Wind

    The Chaotic Wind Rookie

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    yeah i just say 2-8 cept 1 i call prime.

    And on the subject of 5,
    Sabre: above the head

    Foil: Low 4, usually done as a counter parry in a lunge (7 when you're that low to the ground is difficult)
     
  20. Dr Epee

    Dr Epee Rookie

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    I believe the terms are antiquated French ( as has been mentioned). I suspect they were kept on by the 18th and 19th century French maitres des armes as a kind of jargon. Just different enough from the vernacular to give them an air of mystery. You've got to admit that 1, 2, 3 etc. is a lot more prosaic.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2008

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