How do you afford fencing?

Discussion in 'Parent's Corner' started by chrisoplum, Dec 20, 2016.

  1. chrisoplum

    chrisoplum Made the Cut

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    My son loves fencing, and has been fencing for 4 years or so. In the past couple years, he has gone to NAC's and JO's. As you all know, this is all costs- and even to get to some big RJCC's a flight may be involved. We try to make it to as many as we can, but we can't get to all of them on our budget (both of us parents work full time)...so my question is, how does everyone make this work?
     
  2. Steve Khinoy

    Steve Khinoy DE Bracket

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    This is being discussed on the college admissions thread.
     
  3. paulfriedberg

    paulfriedberg Rookie

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    Best to save your money and go to more local tournaments, or even spend a weekend where your son can fence in a few clubs in a bigger city. Summer camps are also a great way to concentrate bang for buck. Your son should only go to larger / further tournaments if he can win no fewer than 4 bouts in 7 person pool.
     
  4. Steve Khinoy

    Steve Khinoy DE Bracket

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    The more I think about Paul's suggestions, the more I like them. They pretty much apply for any age and location. I'd make a partial exception for Summer Nationals, where a young fencer can enter multiple events over several days and experience a really big event.
     
  5. robert

    robert Made the Cut

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    Fencing tournaments can be fun, competitive and even recreational. I have raised three fencers into adulthood have sent them off into the world so I can now actually spend fencing money on myself again after 20 years. So I also know what multiple airfares, hotels, entry fees and gear will run. If your son or anyone's child/youth/teen is competitive they should be working with a coach and the tournaments should be selected as part of thier development plan. If the child is younger then the focus should be on the components of long term athlete development and learning fencing skills and sense. If the goal is college or a national team then the qualifying system will dictate the tournament choices.

    The point of winning sufficient matches to succeed in the pools is a good one and often some success is critical to the encouraging fencers to continue. Some youth fair OK fencing up an age catogery while others don't so it depends on the fencer. Fenicng takes a combination of lessons both group and individual, bouting, free fencing and practice. Tournaments are part of the learning process so is doing other sports and cross training. Local tournaments often offer almost all of this without the cost and pressure of travelling.

    Remember it is Fun First!
     
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  6. Steve Khinoy

    Steve Khinoy DE Bracket

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    Good points.
    Probably expecting to win 4/6 in a pool of 7 is. If everyone expects that, most will be disappointed. At the same time, the fencer has to be prepared to expect to win some -- to look at it another way, to be disappointed to win none.
    (Should the coach tell the fencer what to expect: "The top fencers here are going to kick your butt (you can learn from them), but you can do OK against a lot of others.) ?
    Fencing up in age is different. What is there to lose?
    But one of Paul's points needs reinforcing:
    (depending on where you are,) you might be better off spending a week on one of the coasts and fencing in clubs every night than attending a NAC
     

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