Homeschool for fencing???

Discussion in 'Fencing Discussion' started by shana, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. shana

    shana Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    I am considering homeschooling my fencer for high school. He competes nationally and would like to compete internationally. I would love to hear from other parents that did and how it worked out for college. Was it difficult when applying and was it detrimental? Thanks
     
  2. fencer-dad-of-fencer

    fencer-dad-of-fencer Made the Cut

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2013
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    2
    It worked out well for us (we did online school, which was considered homeschool), and it did make fencing a lot easier, but suspect it was probably a negative for college. We did it for a number of reasons, not just fencing, and we are really happy with the overall result, but we really didn't think the local high school, excellent though it is considered,was suitable. I'm sure it really mostly depends upon the individual child. Probably more important, if you don't live near your fencing club, move closer or find a different club. Better for everybody.
     
  3. ReadyFence

    ReadyFence Podium

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,588
    Likes Received:
    161
    There are only a few online highschools that are considered private schools rather than home schools, and they are pricey and very rigorous. Not sure the higher ranked colleges look at homeschooling as academically rigorous, but if you're not thinking Ivy or higher Div 1 then it might be fine.
     
  4. nasnem

    nasnem Made the Cut

    Joined:
    May 29, 2014
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    14
  5. saberist

    saberist Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2015
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    10
    There is a fencer I know who is currently being recruited by an Ivy, who is homeschooled via an online school. He goes to every NACs and International events, and apparently is qualified enough to be offered a likely letter slot.
     
  6. ReadyFence

    ReadyFence Podium

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,588
    Likes Received:
    161
    There is a significant difference between online school and homeschooling, even though they are often conflated in the public mind. I know of at least three fencers who are or have been in the exact situation saberist describes, and the online school in question is not considered homeschool but rather a top five private HS. That online HS has live classes that students must attend, courses are taught by exceptional staff (it is rare to have an instructor without a PhD), there are a ton of AP and post-AP courses (many required rather than just offered), and the academic rigor is at the top of the curve.
     
  7. Correlli

    Correlli Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    My son has been homeschooled all through high school, and we did not use an online school. Some of his courses (mostly lab science and foreign languages) were outsourced, and he did some online college classes as dual enrollment, but the rest of the courses on his transcript were done at home. None of the coaches or admissions offices we spoke with had any problem with that, and he has accepted an offer to his first choice school. I know many many homeschoolers who have gotten into top schools, including Ivies, with no problem. Excellent test scores (which my son has) help to validate the grades and coursework on the transcript.

    Last year my son did all the NACs/JOs/etc. as well as 4 international competitions, and I don't think we could have handled that schedule if not for homeschooling. Obviously some students must be able to manage it, but I don't think we would have been able to make it work if he'd been in public school.

    The biggest hurdle isn't the coaches or colleges, it's going through the NCAA clearinghouse as a homeschooler. Total PITA, especially now that they have eliminated the homeschool department. You have to fill out Core Course Worksheets for a minimum of 16 core courses, providing course descriptions, goals, schedules, assessments, a list of all texts and resources used (with publisher and ISBN), and grades. And then you have to hope they don't totally screw up inputting the data. :/
     
    jdude97 likes this.
  8. lauralitz

    lauralitz Made the Cut

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    5
    I homeschooled my daughter birth to college. Homeschooling led us to fencing. My daughter competed in NACs, and international Cadet and Junior events. She just graduated from a NCAA DivI school this past spring. (she only competed Freshman-Junior year - a whole other post).

    I agree with Correlli that the biggest hurdle was the NCAA clearinghouse. It was a PITA. I likened the Core Course Worksheets to doing taxes. Since we homeschooled on our own I had a heck of a time with the forms (document all book you use now so you are not scrambling at the eleventh hour to remember it all). In fact our English was based on reading, reading and more reading... Well all said and done. The kid pulled it all off and had a honor roll GPA and has her BS now.

    I love love love homeschooling. Best years of my life. Good luck.

    lauralitz
     
    jdude97 likes this.
  9. shana

    shana Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2016
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for all of your input! The two options we are looking at are an ncaa approved one on one school or an online ncaa approved program, so the paperwork is easier. The one thread I assume is Stanford Online...we did not get in. Again, thanks everyone, it makes that choice less scary.
     
    ReadyFence likes this.

Share This Page