Heel pain causes and treatments

Discussion in 'Fencing Discussion' started by Dar Tanyon, Feb 18, 2004.

  1. Dar Tanyon

    Dar Tanyon Rookie

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    After reading a few threads about fencers suffering from heel pain, I thought it might be useful to research this a bit more. Besides just getting a bruise from landing too hard, there are other causes of heel pain.

    Here is a link that describes heel/foot injuries and treatments. Good luck and happy fencing.

    http://www.acfas.org/brheelds.html
     
  2. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    Interesting article. You can buy gel heel supports to help.
     
  3. sabreur

    sabreur Podium

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    Heel cups and custom orthotics also help.

    MR
     
  4. Talyn

    Talyn Rookie

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    Just outta interest do you have heel cups in both your shoes or just your lunging foot?

    Up till now I've just had it on my right foot but I've changed to gel heel pads now for both feet.
     
  5. Grey

    Grey Rookie

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    I placed heel support in both shoes and frontal gel support ONLY in the front shoe. That helps to cock my back feet.
     
  6. Dar Tanyon

    Dar Tanyon Rookie

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    Heel cups, if you like them or need them, are certainly not going to hurt. There are many types that can be purchased at a local pharmacy.

    The most important piece of advice to glean from this article is to stretch the foot and calf. This is particuarly important if you are getting pain or burning after resting the foot, such as getting up in the morning. If the first few steps are painful, it is because the plantar muscle contracts when it is rested. Stepping on it stretches it causing pain and possibly more tearing and injuries. If you have that kind of injury, stretching before you walk is important. Ice the injury 2-3 times a day for 20 min. will reduce inflamation. Above all, if self-treatment is not working, see a doctor.
     
  7. sabreur

    sabreur Podium

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    I use a heel cup in my front (lunging) shoe, and I wear custom orthotics.

    I've had plantar fascitis twice--both times caused by playing basketball on asphalt while wearing not-so-good shoes.

    In both cases, it took a new pair of orthotics and about six months to clear it up....

    As noted, stretching is important, as are shoes that provide good arch support, and going to see a sports med doctor if the problem persists.

    MR
     
  8. BrianH

    BrianH Rookie

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    Heel pain

    Sabreur says:
    "As noted, stretching is important, as are shoes that provide good arch support, and going to see a sports med doctor if the problem persists."

    Good advice. I have also suffered from plantar fascitis and heel spurs off and on, partly caused by years of running on asphalt roads, partly from fencing, partly from going barefoot for weeks at a time, partly from being older and heavier.

    I am pretty used to pain, but when it got to the point that I couldn't walk, let alone fence, I took myself to a podiatrist and got fitted for orthotics. I was good about stretching, taping and using ice (I rolled my foot on a small bottle of frozen water, getting both ice and a massage) several times a day. I don't like taking analgesics, so I am happy with the therapy described. Along with the orthotics, the regime worked very well and I have no problems with my feet.

    Good luck.

    BH
     
  9. MyraTrue

    MyraTrue Rookie

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    Hmm... not bad advice from the article.

    I think I've griped a bit before about heel pain myself. I would hobble around for weeks feeling like I'd broken something. Agony. All because of the way I fence and that I tend to bring my feet, heel first, down on the floor when I fence. Ouch!

    So... on a whim, I decided to try a pair of $8 for a 2 pack of gel heel inserts. I've never, never had problems since then. What was an every-day occurance disappeared completely, and has not shown up again the last 8 months. VERY nice, and a cheap way to fix it.
     
  10. The0ne

    The0ne Rookie

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    I got gel inserts for my BG Victory shoes, and that helped quite a bit, but I just recently bought the Adidas Asymetrical shoes. . . There are no problems with that shoe, the heel is fully coushined (sp).
     
  11. Dar Tanyon

    Dar Tanyon Rookie

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    More Information on Plantar Faciitus:

    After discussing this with some medicial professionals, it seems that this is a common condition.

    The problem starts with poor arch support (or a person's flat arches). This causes a pronation of the foot while walking or running. That is the source of the inflamation. In general, most shoes do not provide enough arch support. Heel cups may provide some relief to a sore heel and some stability to the foot, but arch supports will provide a better solution as it addresses the problem at the source. Gel inserts, while comfortable, do not provide arch support either.

    If you are suffering from this condition, the first task is to reduce inflamation. Ice, rest, medication to reduce the inflamation. See a doctor.

    Arch supports can be purchased at a pharmacy over the counter. There are many styles so pick one that fits your needs. Remember, you want support for the arch. If that does not help, your doctor can arrange for a set of custom orthotics.

    Lastly, exercise and stretching.

    While recovering and returning to sports and other activities, use pain as a guide. If it starts to hurt a lot, you are doing too much. Rest it. It can take a long time to fully heal, so be patient. Good luck!
     

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