College Fencing - How Does the Process Work?

Discussion in 'Fencing Discussion' started by ra2000a, Jun 24, 2005.

  1. ra2000a

    ra2000a Rookie

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    So i'm a rising high school senior and i was wondering how i should contact coaches. should i notify them that im fencing in sacramento? should i wait till i get results?
     
  2. oiuyt

    oiuyt Podium

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    If you have a list of schools that you think you might be interested in, absolutely contact the coaches now. Coaches, generally, would prefer to have seen potential recruits/prospects (whatever word you prefer to use) actually compete. The earlier the coaches are aware of your interest, the easier it is for them to find a time that you are fencing at an event that they are attending. Additionally, contacting the coaches will make them aware of you and provide them with contact information so that they can pass along information about their programs. This, in turn, should help you make an informed decision of what programs/schools are likely to be of interest to you as you perform your college search.

    The fewer opportunities coaches have to see you competing at the national level, the more important it is for them to be aware, in advance, of those opportunities.

    Drop an email, a phone call, a letter. Tell the coach that you're a rising senior and that you're interested in his/her program. Give basic information such as your weapon, number of years fencing, any information about your level of fencing (classification(s), tournament results, etc.). Likely the coach will reply with some information about his/her program, including a form requesting much the same information that I've listed, as well as academic information (GPA, SAT scores, class rank, etc. (all of which would be appropriate in the initial contact as well)), and whatever additional information that coach has found, in the past, to be useful.

    -B :)
     
  3. akaiyuki

    akaiyuki Rookie

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    oiuyt pretty much summed it up. Usually you can find coach's contact information on the school website. Look under athletics or look up fencing. The site might have a special page for recruiting (for example UCSD has a form which you can fill out online), others you might have to look into contact info for staff/coaches.
     
  4. lefty_monster

    lefty_monster Rookie

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    I'm here to add my confusion to the thread... :blah:

    I was looking on the NCAA website and it said that there are specific rules govorning when and how coaches and potential athletes may contact each other.

    Are there ways to get full scholorships for fencing? People that I've talked to have said that they are few and far between.
     
  5. Goofy

    Goofy Rookie

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    For the basics on NCAA fencing and athlete information go to:

    http://www2.ncaa.org/sports/winter/fencing/

    www.ncaaclearinghouse.net/ncaa/NCAA/common/index.html

    As for contact between coaches and students, I believe the rule is that the student must be at least a sophomore or junior for the coach; the coach cannot make contact before that, but the student is able to write and ask questions. Most definitely go through the find the 'email-drop or address and send a note' process.

    For scholarships, that is done through the individual university. Ask about this possibility when contacting the coach.

    Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2005
  6. prototoast

    prototoast Podium

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    By the time a fencer is a rising senior, I believe all those restrictions are gone.
    Yes, you have to contact individual schools which offer them. They are difficult to get--if you're not a top national fencer, you won't get one, but you can still be recruited (help with admissions), so it's good to talk to coaches.
     
  7. akaiyuki

    akaiyuki Rookie

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    I believe some/many NCAA schools does not even offer any scholarship for fencing. But it does help with admissions. If your GPA and SAT scores are good enough, coaches can put you on the recruiting list and you're almost guaranteed admission.
     
  8. oiuyt

    oiuyt Podium

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    How much pull coaches have varies tremendously from institution to institution.

    As far as scholarships go, there is certainly money available, but akaiyuki is correct that many programs cannot offer any. None of the division III programs (roughly half of the NCAA programs in the country) can offer athletics aid. Of the division I programs a number don't (none of the Ivys, for example, due to conference rules). The programs that do have money available have a wide variety of how they apportion that aid. A list of what division every fencing program is can be found on the NCAA website. Women's teams - Men's teams

    Some target only fencers that have a demonstrated ability to make top-10 junior standings (US or foreign) and then go after those fencers with full rides. Others split the money up to offer partial aid to a larger number of athletes. I've heard of at least one that doesn't offer any aid to incoming freshmen, requiring that every athlete "prove" themselves at the NCAA level before even getting consideration for athletics aid. How good you need to be in order to get aid will vary school to school and year to year for a program, based on what each school needs at the time you happen to be looking at schools.

    -B :)
     
  9. rdinap

    rdinap Rookie

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    Having just gone through the process, these are my observations:

    1. Don't wait around for college coaches to make initial contact with you. They won't unless you are at the top of the National Rankings. You must initiate the contact them.

    2. IMPORTANT. Most college fencing programs have their own websites. Go to the websites of the colleges in which you are interested and fill out their online questionaire. Following this the coaches should contact you through email.

    3. Fenfool (fenfool.com) has a link to all collegiate fencing programs.

    4. Most contacts (after sophomore year and after haven taken the SAT) should be done through email. There is no limit to email contacts between coaches and prospects. There is a limited number of direct contact (face to face or over the phone) that can occur.

    5. Divisions (I, II or III) are pretty much irrelevant when it comes to collegiate fencing. Div III - there are only a couple of Div II schools - will compete agains Div I teams, unlike other sports.

    6. Best of luck.

    PS It appears that SAT are weighted a little more heavily than grades.
     
  10. Sciurus-Rex

    Sciurus-Rex Rookie

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    Anyone 40+ years old try going back to finish an undergrad degree and get a fencing scholarship?
     
  11. DHCJr

    DHCJr Armorer

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    How many 40+ year olds, who have never gone to college, when they in their teens and 20's and then go to college? This is not an idle question. If the answer is yes, then no they can't get a scholarship.

    There is what is called a 5-year rule for NCAA Division I atheletes, the only ones that can give scholarships: an athelete is no longer eligible 5 years after they start their 1st semester/quarter.
     
  12. epeemike81

    epeemike81 Rookie

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    Actually, it is an idle question, because ANYBODY over the age of 27 (I believe, but somewhere thereabouts anyway) is inelligible, regardless of previous matriculation (or lack thereof).

    -m
     
  13. DHCJr

    DHCJr Armorer

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    Where did you get this information?
     
  14. RebelFencer

    RebelFencer Podium

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    As this was a matter of interest to me recently I looked some stuff up.

    You DO NOT lose any eligibility as long as you are not competing as a part of an NCAA team. Once you turn 21 you lose a year of eligibility every year after that.
     
  15. oiuyt

    oiuyt Podium

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    Pulling information from the NCAA division I manual (which I keep on the bookshelf next to my desk)... (note division III rules are different, as are division II rules (division III cannot offer scholarships, division II can, but under different rules than division I, I don't have the manuals for those divisions, but they should be available online from the NCAA website)).

    Every year after the athlete's 21st birthday, but prior to initial collegiate enrollment, in which the athlete participates in organized sports competition counts as a year of varsity competition in that sport. I assume this is where epeemike's 27-year-old rule is coming from. This rule does not include competitions while in the US armed services.

    There are various other rules that modify the five-year rule. Years exempted from the counted time include time spent in the armed services, on official church missions, or with recognized foreign aid service of the US government. This includes such things as Military Sea Transport Service, Peace Corps, and service as a conscientious objector ordered by the Selective Service Commission (or equivalent authority in a foreign nation) in lieu of active military duty. The religious mission exemption is why, for example, you will see a number of BYU football players that are a couple of years older than typically seen in collegiate programs.

    An institution may approve a one-year extension of the five-year period of a female student-athlete for reasons of pregnancy.

    Female student-athletes enrolled prior to the 1981-1982 academic year are not subject to the five-year rule, but much follow the 10-semester/15-quarter rule used in division II and III.

    Waivers can be granted to the five-year rule by the Committee on Student-Athlete Reinstatement.

    RebelFencer- Here're the rules that apply to what you're talking about:
    USFA (or FIE) competition clearly fits the description for organized competition. If you aren't fencing, however, those years don't chew up eligibility years (they still chew calendar years if you've previously been enrolled in college full-time). If you're 40+ and have never been enrolled in college (or are a female, enrolled prior to the 1981-82 year) then the 5-year rule doesn't apply, and, assuming you haven't been involved in organized competition, you could still be eligible for varsity participation. Unless there's another rule which I've missed (clearly possible).

    Lucky me, I get to take my annual compliance test on Wednesday when I get to spend 2 hours answering questions like this (fortunately open book).

    -B :)
     
  16. epeemike81

    epeemike81 Rookie

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    But it's fairly unlikely that you're going to make a varsity team in ANY sport if you're forty and haven't been involved in any organized competition.

    -m
     

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