Can you share information about being assistant coach

Discussion in 'Coaching Corner' started by armine, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. armine

    armine Rookie

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    Hello. Can you give me information about being assistant coach? Like what do they do and how to become or if you have personal experience. Thank you.
     
  2. keropie

    keropie Podium

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    It would vary a great deal depending on the type of program (NCAA, high school, competitive club, recreational club, etc.), and the specific program. Do you have a specific type of assistant coaching you're inquiring about?
     
  3. armine

    armine Rookie

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    To be honest, I do not have anything specific in mind, but I guess competitive club. Thank you.
     
  4. keropie

    keropie Podium

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    So, at a club you'll probably be expected to lead some group lessons, maybe physical training classes, and potentially give some individual lessons (depending on the club, your skill level, etc.). You may also be expected to provide some referee services at the club's events, or other local events, as well as traveling to events to support the athletes.

    At some clubs, there may be multiple levels of assistant coaches; some may be in charge of an entire weapon, or gender+weapon. That varies greatly.
     
  5. armine

    armine Rookie

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    Thank you for the information. I was also wondering if it is possible for an assistant coach to practice fencing at the same time on a high level. Thank you.
     
  6. tbryan

    tbryan Podium

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    Note that keropie is specifically talking about being an assistant coach in the U.S. If you're still in Bulgaria or looking to coach in some other country, then you should definitely contact that country's national federation: http://fie.org/fie/structure/federations-map. As someone said in that other thread, "In some countries, a professional license is needed to coach. Getting that license requires formal training and passing an exam."

    Literally anyone in the US can open an independent fencing club and call themselves a coach. There are no specific regulations for coaching fencing. Of course, there's no general support for fencing clubs in the US. Clubs have to work out their own business plan, insurance, etc. There are many different models. The will probably be more rules or expectations for NCAA programs, high school coaches, etc.

    Many full time coaches in the US have a related university degree, some fencing-specific training/certification from a program in another country, and/or coach-specific training from the (no longer active) US Fencing Coaches' College or certification from the https://usfca.org/. But I know that many assistant coaches do not. The normal way people get involved in coaching in the US is probably at the club where they are currently training. For example, lessons and membership at a fencing club in the US can be quite expensive, and an experienced fencer may start coaching to help defray those costs. Many active fencers start as an assistant coach with no other training that "experienced fencer, has taken classes/lessons at this club for years." Therefore, the only thing that you have to do to work as an assistant coach is to convince the owner of the club or the head coach to hire you. :)

    I'm not sure what you mean by a "high level." There are certainly some fencers who work and train and compete internationally. Maybe you should reach out to one of them for advice? To be successful, they seem to have a very flexible job and a daily schedule that looks something like wake up, fencing lesson, physical conditioning, work all day, another lesson / practice bouting, bed time. Repeat! Flexibility is normally required because of all of the travel for international events to achieve and maintain an good FIE ranking.

    Of course, if competing at a "high level" means international competition, then working in the US is difficult. There are so many tournaments based in / around Europe that our national team members spend many weeks of the year traveling out of the country. Not all employers permit that kind of flexibility, and without sponsorship, the costs add up quickly.

    Good luck!
     
  7. armine

    armine Rookie

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    Thank you for the help.
     

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