Altering/tailoring fencing uniforms

Discussion in 'Armory - Q&A' started by wwittman, May 28, 2019.

  1. wwittman

    wwittman DE Bracket

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    If I want to have uniforms altered, what do I (or more accurately, my tailor) need to know about keeping them both safe and FIE approved?

    Anything?
     
  2. mfp

    mfp Podium

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    Obviously, alterations bring forward the expiration date by 2 years. :)
     
  3. wwittman

    wwittman DE Bracket

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    So... you don’t know...
     
  4. brtech

    brtech Podium

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    You really would like her to use the right thread, but I don't know what that actually is. After that, it's mostly preserving the thickness of the material (in some designs, some areas have double thickness of material) and the basic seam design of the product.
     
  5. Purple Fencer

    Purple Fencer Podium

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    For sabre gloves, they wanted kevlar or similar thread. Probably the same for jackets, knicks, and underarms. They want a certain strength in the seams.
     
  6. wwittman

    wwittman DE Bracket

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    Kevlar thread??

    I'd probably only be looking to shorten sleeves or legs slightly.
     
  7. Inquartata

    Inquartata Podium

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    You could just turn over the cuffs...

    I have done that with a jacket whose sleeves were too long. No sewing involved, you can roll them back to full length whenever you need to do so, and I can't see anyone having problem with a double layer of FIE material at the wrist. ( Would that make it FIE 1600N? )
     
  8. Mergs

    Mergs Podium

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    If all you are doing is shortening the arms and legs, that shouldn't be a problem. Normal tailoring techniques will work fine. As far as I can tell in working with clothing, they just use a normal cotton thread. As for the FIE certification - that is for the cloth only (IIRC), so alterations shouldn't affect this.
     
  9. wwittman

    wwittman DE Bracket

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    so heavy nylon thread (as was suggested in some ancient threads on here) isn't necessary to stay legal?
     
  10. Purple Fencer

    Purple Fencer Podium

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    So what would constitute a material change?
     
  11. dcchew

    dcchew Podium

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    I'd recommend a synthetic outdoor grade of thread material. You want any repair stitching to be able to deal with sweat and a lot of stretching and abuse.

    Good sewing technique is always important too. When I had my new jacket altered, I gave the seamstress a bobbin of good nylon thread to do the alterations with.
     
  12. dcchew

    dcchew Podium

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    A replacement of any panel of the jacket or knickers with a different material.

    This doesn't include a separate panel with the fencer's name stenciled on it that is sewn over the previous jacket owner's name. Most times when I've seen this done, the material is not the same as the jacket original material.
     
  13. mfp

    mfp Podium

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    Cuffs on fencing jackets and breeches are not included in the zone of protection. If you shorten sleeves or legs by doing so at the cuffs, you won't alter the required zone of protection because cuffs aren't included as part of it in the first place.
     
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  14. wwittman

    wwittman DE Bracket

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    cool
    thanks
     
  15. K O'N

    K O'N Podium

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    Do not use cotton thread, good grief. I don't do major tailoring but I do replace zippers and cuffs and so on. I use V69 sail thread:

    https://www.sailrite.com/Thread-V-69-White-Polyester-UV-4oz-1-400-Yds

    Alex Paul talked about what thread they use here:

    https://www.fencing.net/forums/threads/fie-jacket-zipper-repair.43238/#post-802535

    It's not cotton.

    I think Gary said they use Dacron V69 in repairs, but don't quote me until you ask him. Anyway, don't use cotton. It doesn't matter for cuffs, but for a zipper it's kind of important.
     
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  16. Mergs

    Mergs Podium

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    If you were to alter the piece to make it bigger and you needed to add material, the new material would probably have to be FIE certified. That said, does that mean if you take a piece of fabric from an old FIE jacket and use it to make the change to another FIE jacket then that's ok? Dunno how someone doing equipment control where FIE was required would react. Most likely it would be rejected out of hand because it doesn't match the 'norm'.

    As for thread, as I said, in my repairing club equipment (and making alterations to lame's) my experience that the thread used on most clothing is normal cotton thread. But then again it is mostly club stuff, not FIE.
     

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